In The Name Of…

18 Wives, submit to your husbands, as is fitting in the Lord.

19 Husbands, love your wives, and do not be harsh with them.

Often people forget the Bible wasn’t written in modern English, and that the Bible wasn’t written with verse numbers. Chapters were added in the thirteen century, and verses in the sixteenth century!

So, when Paul wrote this he didn’t put nice, neat, and handy dandy paragraphs and subheadings in. So if your Bible reads ‘Rules for Christian householdsʼ, or something similar, thatʼs not Paul! Do you know, you can buy a ‘Readerʼs Bibleʼ, where there are no verses, no paragraphs, no chapters, just the text?!

Anyway, if you read this in the KJV, for example, it just rolls on through so this exhortation about marriage and home life comes directly after Paul instructs us that whatever we do, we are to do it in the name of Jesus, like this,

…whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him. Wives, submit to your husbands, as is fitting in the Lord. Husbands, love your wives, and do not be harsh with them.

Wives, submit to your husbands, as is fitting in the Lord.

Husbands, love your wives and do not be harsh with them.

These two exhortations then become, in the name of Jesus and giving thanks to God, wives submit to your husbandsin the name of Jesus and being thankful to God, husbands love your wives.

That is so much more powerful, right?

Love your wife in the name of Jesus.

Submit to your husband in the name of Jesus.

If we keep Jesus as number 1 then our marriage, home life, relationships, and everything about us will be as God intended it to be, and is there a better life to live than the life that God intended us to live? 

2 Timothy 2.16-19 – God’s Firm Foundation Stands

16 But avoid irreverent babble, for it will lead people into more and more ungodliness, 17 and their talk will spread like gangrene. Among them are Hymenaeus and Philetus, 18 who have swerved from the truth, saying that the resurrection has already happened. They are upsetting the faith of some. 19 But God’s firm foundation stands, bearing this seal:

“The Lord knows those who are his,” and,

“Let everyone who names the name of the Lord depart from iniquity.”

In contrast to the encouragement and exhortation in v.15, here Paul shows Timothy the other side of the coin and says avoid irreverent babble. Timothy was encouraged to keep the main thing as the main thing and rightly handle the Word of truth and if he does not, Paul says that it will lead people into more and more ungodliness, and their talk will spread like gangrene.

Maybe here your Bible says cancer in place of gangrene, either way the message is clear; false teaching and inaccurate handling of God’s Word spreads quickly and dangerously and leads people astray into ungodliness, the very opposite of what Timothy as pastor has been called to do.

Despite what people may say that the Bible teaches, despite false and inaccurate handling of God’s Word, despite anything that man can do, God’s firm foundation stands. The Gospel still stands, the Word of God still stands, and the Lord knows who are his. Those who are His are to depart from iniquity, and this is what Timothy has been called to teach and preach (vv.11-13, 15, 3.10-17, 1 Timothy 4.6-16).

Today, let us all consider and consolidate the fact that we are His (Romans 8.16-17), and let us depart from iniquity through putting into action the knowledge that comes from right and proper handling of His Word. 

2 Timothy 2.15 – Rightly Handling

Today the pastoral advice keeps on coming for Timothy, and it’s another exhortation that we can all apply.

15 Do your best to present yourself to God as one approved, a worker who has no need to be ashamed, rightly handling the word of truth.

Earlier in chapter two Timothy was encouraged to have a hard-working attitude, and here today he is encouraged to do your best. The idea that the Christian life is one of passive agreement and being along for the ride is found nowhere in God’s Word. 

Being approved and having no need to be ashamed carries the idea that on the day we stand before the judgement seat of Christ (2 Corinthians 5.10), what we have done for and in the name of Jesus will be laid out and evaluated. Paul writes this to the Corinthians,

…we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ, that each one may receive the things done in the body, according to what he has done, whether good or bad.

Simply, we are to do our best in the here and now so that when we stand before the judgement seat of Christ and our work is evaluated we have no need to be ashamed. For Timothy, his primary responsibility as pastor is to rightly handle the word of truth

To be told to rightly handle something implies there is a wrong way to handle it, and this must be the primary responsibility for Timothy, for a pastor today, and for all of us who claim to be following Jesus. There are right ways to handle, divide, and interpret the Bible, and there are wrong ways. Sadly, we don’t have to look far to find people twisting, misusing, misinterpreting, sensationalising, emotionalising, and just plain wrongly handling the Word of God.

Simply, it says what it says and it means what it means.

There is one correct, orthodox way to interpret a passage.

There is one correct, orthodox interpretation, yet many applications.

Sadly, some feel that there are many interpretations and many applications, but this cannot be. The Word of God cannot say two things in one passage that are contradictory. 

David Guzik writes on this,

This is an important point: The Bible does not mean just what anyone wants it to mean…We can’t just pick the interpretation that seems most comfortable to us and claim it as true – it must be rightly dividing the word of truth, and it must be consistent with what the Bible says in the specific passage and with the entire message of the Scriptures.

So for Timothy as pastor, this was a primary responsibility. Shouldn’t it also be so for all of us? Shouldn’t we all want to be approved by God, a worker who has no need to be ashamed, someone who rightly handles the Word of truth?


If you don’t know where to start with Bible interpretation, here are a couple of books that have been helpful for me.

  • Basic Bible Interpretation by Roy Zuck 
    • 978-0781438773
  • Living By the Book: The Art and Science of Reading the Bible

    • 978-0802408235

Joy To The World

Do you remember when you were a kid and Christmas Day rolled around? You tore into something lovingly wrapped and discovered that thing you had been wanting for so long…oh the joy you felt! You could not, at that moment, have felt any happier. The joy you felt was indescribable; that someone loved you enough to give you exactly what you wanted, exactly what you needed, and they willingly paid the price for you to have it.

Joy to the World describes, essentially, this feeling.

Joy to the world
Joy to the world
Joy to the world, the Lord is come
Let earth receive her King
Let every heart prepare Him room
And Heaven and nature sing

The whole Old Testament in your Bible points forward to the coming of the Lord (if you don’t have a Bible read it here for free!). The New Testament documents the life and legacy of the Lord Jesus, and one thing constantly associated with Him is joy.

The song is filled with Scripture (Isaiah 9.6, Isaiah 11.10, John 12.15,  Revelation 17.14, Revelation 19.11-16, and Psalm 98.5-9 to name some!).

As we made room in our lives for that gift we ripped open on Christmas Day, possibly discarding old things to make way for it, this year let every heart prepare Him room, discarding old things and receiving our King

 

All Wrapped Up: Where Was Jesus Born?

When you think about Christmas, what comes to mind? 

Maybe family, friends, food? 

Turkey, tinsel, trimmings? 

Carols, cards, cakes? 

Or, maybe, gifts, presents?

Christmas Day is fast approaching, and there may be some exchanging of gifts. Maybe you are really excited to give that special someone that special gift, maybe you are really excited to open some gifts, to tear open some presents…but before you can see what is inside, before you can watch someone open their gift, you have to unwrap it, don’t you, and before that, someone took the time to wrap up that gift.

In Luke 2.7-12 we read of a very special gift all wrapped up.

7 And she gave birth to her firstborn son and wrapped him in swaddling cloths and laid him in a manger, because there was no place for them in the inn. 8 And in the same region there were shepherds out in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night. 9 And an angel of the Lord appeared to them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were filled with great fear. 10 And the angel said to them, “Fear not, for behold, I bring you good news of great joy that will be for all the people. 11 For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, who is Christ the Lord. 12 And this will be a sign for you: you will find a baby wrapped in swaddling cloths and lying in a manger.”

Interestingly, one line of thinking can show that the shepherds who watched sheep near Bethlehem were no ordinary shepherds, but that they were there to care for the sheep who bred lambs for the temple. These were temple flocks and therefore very special sheep.

I read that

“Bethlehem’s shepherds were known to care for the temple flock. These men may have also protected and cared for the lambs used in temple sacrifice.”

Dr. John Macdonald gives more detail,

Consider the possibility that these were not shepherds of ordinary sheep.

Alfred Edersheim (1825-1889) provides an intriguing answer to our question. He was Jewish by birth and training. Later, he became a follower of Jesus, studied and taught biblical theology in Scotland, and wrote The Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah. Writing about these shepherds, Edersheim referenced the Jewish Mishnah

The Mishnah is a collection of documents recording oral traditions governing the lives of Jewish people during the period of the Pharisees. As such, an understanding of the Mishnah gives us insight into how Jewish people lived during the time of Jesus.

One regulation in the Mishnah “expressly forbids the keeping of flocks throughout the land of Israel, except in the wildernesses – and the only flocks otherwise kept, would be those for the Temple-services” (Bab K. 7:7; 80a).

Jerusalem and Bethlehem, and their surrounding fields were not in the wilderness where ordinary flocks of sheep were kept. Therefore, according to the Jewish regulations, the flocks under the care of the shepherds near Bethlehem must have been “for the Temple-services.” These shepherds watched over sheep destined as sacrifices in the Temple at Jerusalem. 

These guys were, then, trained specially to raise lambs for the temple, their task was to raise sacrificial lambs. They had to make sure that when a lamb was offered without spot or blemish (Exodus 12.5, 1 Peter 1.9), that this truly was the case. Apparently, these lambs were wrapped in cloths to prevent injury or harm.

Back in Luke we read that 

“…she gave birth to her firstborn son and wrapped him in swaddling cloths and laid him in a manger…

…this will be a sign for you: you will find a baby wrapped in swaddling cloths and lying in a manger.”

The place where these special lambs were born and raised was in a place called Migdal Edar, “The tower of the flock.”  on the outskirts of Bethlehem. This watchtower was used by the shepherds for protection from their enemies and wild animals. In this building the priests would bring in the sheep that were about to give birth to their lambs. The tower of the flock at Bethlehem is the perfect place for the Lamb of God to be born (John 1.29).


In the very place where thousands of sacrificial lambs had been born before Him, now the ultimate gift of God to the world had come.


Micah 4.8 foretells the place where the Savior would be born,

“As for you, O tower (Migdal) of the flock, the stronghold of the daughter of Zion, to you shall it come, even the former dominion shall come, the kingdom of the daughter of Jerusalem.”

During lambing season the sheep were brought to the tower from the fields, as the lower level functioned as the birthing room for sacrificial lambs. Due to the fact that the shepherds were themselves under the care of Rabbis, these shepherd-priests would maintain a ceremonially clean birthing place. What a perfect place for the Lamb of God to be born, a ceremonially clean place where sacrificial lambs were born. The manger in the tower of the flock was not a smelly stable with other animals as we often see at this time of year, but the perfect place in the perfect place (Micah 4.8, 5.2).

I read recently that,

“After the lambs were born, the priestly shepherds would place the lambs in the hewn depression of a limestone rock known as the manger and wrap the newborn lambs in swaddling clothes preventing them from thrashing about and harming themselves until they had calmed down so they could be inspected to meet the requirement of being without spot or blemish.”

“…she gave birth to her firstborn son and wrapped him in swaddling cloths and laid him in a manger

…this will be a sign for you: you will find a baby wrapped in swaddling cloths and lying in a manger.” (Luke 2.7, 12)

What was the sign?  The baby wrapped in cloths. 

Where was the baby lying?  In a manger. 

Do you think the shepherds understood when they were told this? 

Absolutely!

There was no need for the angels to give the shepherds a map-pin or directions to the birthplace of Jesus, the sign of the manger could only mean their manger at the Tower of the Flock where they routinely birthed and wrapped sacrificial lambs. We can reasonably conclude that these shepherds knew exactly who this baby was, and exactly where He was born.


They had now been told that the reality to which their life’s work pointed had now arrived!


William Barclay said 

“It is a lovely thought that the shepherds who looked after the Temple lambs were the first to see the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world.” 

Jesus was the sacrificial lamb, and He was our sacrificial lamb.

Jesus was wrapped as a baby in the traditional cloths of lambs and placed in a manger. He was wrapped as a baby, wrapped as a lamb, and wrapped as a gift. He is the Lamb who came to take away the sins of the world; spotless and without blemish.

The point of all this is to say that He is the real gift we are celebrating this time of year, He was wrapped; wrapped as a baby, wrapped as a lamb, and wrapped as a gift. 

The angels announced the birth of a Saviour that day in the city of David, which is the gift that we all need, not just at Christmas time, but today, tomorrow, the day after that, and the day after that, and every single day after that, too. 

How excited will you be on the 25th to open a gift from a loved one, or to watch a loved one open your gift…that is the feeling we need when we think of the gift of God to the world, His Son, the gift of Jesus.

Jesus Christ is the better gift.

He is the gift of a clean slate before God, 

He is the gift of reconciliation, 

He is the gift of eternal life, 

He is the gift of the opportunity to have a right relationship with God,

He is the gift of forgiveness from our sins.

He knew that we needed that gift, even before we did. Before we even knew it was there, before the foundation of the world, this gift was ready, poised, waiting to be accepted, through faith in Him alone. This gift was always plan A for humanity, never plan B. That’s what we gather to celebrate at this time of year, to commemorate and to consolidate.

All we have to do is take the gift. 

Will you take it? 

Have you taken it?

Will you take the free gift of salvation that Christ wants to give you right now? 

I pray you do now, tomorrow, and every day.

What a wonderful gift, the best gift ever given.