Luke 2.7 – The Simplicity of Wonder

Often times nowadays when we want to tell a great story we embellish the details, don’t we. We don’t lie, but what is good we really emphasise, and what is not so great, we don’t spend much time on. Here in Luke 2.7, the simplicity of the birth of Jesus is said in just 8 words,

“And she gave birth to her firstborn son…”

There is no need for embellishment, there is no need for extra details to be overemphasised, there is no need for unneeded words. 

“And she gave birth to her firstborn son…”

The first three-quarters of the Bible have been looking forward to this date.

The fist two chapters of Luke have dealt with events leading up to this date.

The first few millennia of the earth since Genesis 3.15 have been looking forward to this date.

There is no need to add to the simplicity of the wonderful events that took place that night.

We know they changed the course of human history. We know this is when an all-powerful creator God pierced the space-time continuum and took up residence among us. We know that this moment is the beginning of a point in history from which much of the Western world would begin to orbit (whether they know or acknowledge it or not). We know.

“And she gave birth to her firstborn son…”

As we move into this Christmas season day by day, it is easy to fall prey to the trappings and temptations of the season; one more of those…buying that extra…hanging that additional…eating/drinking just one more…Really though, the simplicity of the account of Luke gives us a model for the season, truth first. 

“And she gave birth to her firstborn son…”

Truth first, she gave birth to her firstborn son…Christmas is about the birth of Jesus.

Enjoy the accompaniments to this time of year, for sure, but always keeping the simplicity of the wondrous events of that night first and foremost.

1 Timothy 3.14-15 – Clarity of Scripture

Careful and proper Bible reading seems to be, sadly, not the normal way of reading the Bible for most people. There either seems to be the idea that we must sensationalize and emotionalize it so as to provoke an emotional response (a danger which D.Martin Lloyd-Jones warns against), or we need to inject ourselves into the text to be the original readers/recipients, or else that the whole thing is unknowable and therefore, you know, what’s the point? More often than not, the real people writing the text of Scripture, inspired by the Holy Spirit, will make plain and simple their intention.

14 I hope to come to you soon, but I am writing these things to you so that, 15 if I delay, you may know how one ought to behave in the household of God, which is the church of the living God, a pillar and buttress of the truth.

We said that this letter was from Paul to Timothy with instructions on how to lead the church. We’ve seen the importance of prayer, the importance of right teaching, the Gospel to be proclaimed, and the character of those to be appointed to help lead. Today, Paul is as clear as can be that he hopes to visit, but, if he is delayed, this letter is for Timothy to know how people ought to behave in the household of God

Passages about the character of leaders, the interaction between men and women, the high standards for handling the Word and the teaching of the church all folds into this purpose, so people know how to behave in the household of God, which is the church of the living God, a pillar and buttress of the truth

There are some deep and wonderful truths in the Word that we could talk about until the Lord returns or calls us home. There are passages that were so specific to specific peoples at specific times, but, if we read the Word carefully and properly, considering context and purpose, we will see that there is more often than not a strikingly clear purpose statement within each book of the Bible.

Today, look at passages like 1 Timothy 3.14-15, Hebrews 8.1-2, 2 Timothy 4.1-2, John 20.30-31, Luke 1.1-4, Romans 1.15, and 1 Corinthians 1.10-11, and see and marvel at the clarity of Scripture. It is as plain and as simple as we need it to be at the points we need it to be. Charles Hodge called it a ‘plain book’. It is plain and understandable when we approach it carefully and properly.

Read it today and see how it speaks to you!