Moses – His Leadership

Many people look at the Moses-style of leadership as autocratic, authoritarian, and absolute: there’s this one guy through whom everything must go, kind of thing. Personally, I don’t see this to be the case.

First things first, Moses always sees himself as second-in-command to the Lord.

Moses said to God, “Who am I that I should go to Pharaoh and bring the children of Israel out of Egypt?”

[God] said, “But I will be with you, and this shall be the sign for you, that I have sent you: when you have brought the people out of Egypt, you shall serve God on this mountain.”

Exodus 3.11-12

Moses is also painfully aware of his own shortcomings (4.10), and at one point even asks NOT to be the leader (4.13). He settles for a situation wherein he basically relays information from God via Aaron,

[God] said, “Is there not Aaron, your brother, the Levite? I know that he can speak well. Behold, he is coming out to meet you, and when he sees you, he will be glad in his heart. You shall speak to him and put the words in his mouth, and I will be with your mouth and with his mouth and will teach you both what to do. He shall speak for you to the people, and he shall be your mouth, and you shall be as God to him.And take in your hand this staff, with which you shall do the signs.”

Exodus 4.13-17

He grows into the role, as all leaders do, and is firmly established by God as ‘the guy‘ (Numbers 12). It is then in Exodus 18 that we see a key piece of leadership structure, a piece of information those seeking to discredit Moses and this style often overlook.

His Father-in-Law says, look,

“What you are doing is not good. You and the people with you will certainly wear yourselves out, for the thing is too heavy for you. You are not able to do it alone. Now obey my voice; I will give you advice, and God be with you! You shall represent the people before God and bring their cases to God, and you shall warn them about the statutes and the laws, and make them know the way in which they must walk and what they must do. Moreover, look for able men from all the people, men who fear God, who are trustworthy and hate a bribe, and place such men over the people as chiefs of thousands, of hundreds, of fifties, and of tens. And let them judge the people at all times. Every great matter they shall bring to you, but any small matter they shall decide themselves. So it will be easier for you, and they will bear the burden with you. If you do this, God will direct you, you will be able to endure, and all this people also will go to their place in peace.”

Exodus 18.17-23

Clear then; God in control, leadership covenant with one man, who then appoints other men to care for groups of people within the wider family. We see this mirrored in the New Testament with Jesus, the Church, Pastors, and Elders (see Ephesians 1.22, 4.10-12, 5.23, Colossians 2.10, Titus 1.5).

What this means for you is that we all have the opportunity to live and serve and thrive in structures that God has tried, tested, and found to be true over many, many years.

For you, this means that Jesus is the Head of any church you are part of. If He is not, it may be time to gracefully talk to those in leadership.

For you, this means that the plans and protections that God has always put in place for His people are still there for you. Is there a better place to be?

If you are journaling along with this series, try this today – who has God put in these roles in my life? What is my role in my current location? How can I support those in God-appointed roles in my life?

1 Timothy 5.21-25 – Personal Reminders

21 In the presence of God and of Christ Jesus and of the elect angels I charge you to keep these rules without prejudging, doing nothing from partiality. 22 Do not be hasty in the laying on of hands, nor take part in the sins of others; keep yourself pure. 23 (No longer drink only water, but use a little wine for the sake of your stomach and your frequent ailments.) 24 The sins of some people are conspicuous, going before them to judgment, but the sins of others appear later. 25 So also good works are conspicuous, and even those that are not cannot remain hidden.

First and foremost Timothy as the leader of the local church, and we all by extension, must seek to serve and please God and…Christ Jesus. The leadership of a local church, as the Christian life in general, is to be lived in worship, reverence, and obedience to the Lord. Serving Him first, we show no prejudice and partiality.

I read something that said that in church, everyone should be treated as they will be before Christ.

Paul then gives more instructions about church leading; ordinations and the conduct of the minister in v.22, and then some personal advice to Timothy to care for his health so that he is able to fulfil his ministry (v.23). Evidently, Paul had no promoting to declare miraculous healing over Timothy, rather he told the young leader to take advantage of the natural remedies and medicines on offer – more on this below

Paul is evidently concerned with the conduct of Timothy as vv.24-25 show, and we must all remember that whatever we do, be it good or bad, nothing is hidden from our Father in heaven (Hebrews 4.13).

This is why we must remember we are serving Him first (v.21), that our conduct matters (v.22), that we must take care of ourselves and the bodies God has given us (v.23), and so, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God (1 Corinthians 10.31).


 


 

David Guzik writes on v.23,

Timothy was probably abstaining from alcohol for the sake of setting a good example. However, this abstinence was hurting his health – wine was safer to drink than water. So, Paul told Timothy that it wasn’t wise to sacrifice his health for the sake of this abstinence – he would do more good for the Jesus and His kingdom by taking care of his body in this circumstance.

“Paul is simply saying that there is no good in an asceticism which does the body more harm than good.” (Barclay)

If it is God’s will for all to be healed right now, then Paul (and the Holy Spirit who inspired him) here led Timothy into sin – calling him to look to a natural remedy instead of a divine healing. God uses natural remedies and the work of doctors in healing, as well as the supernatural power of the Holy Spirit – they don’t contradict one another.

1 Timothy 3.8-13 – A Deacon in Character

Yesterday we said that the character of an Elder is something we should all be working towards displaying. Today, it’s the same with Deacons. How your church deploys the service of Deacons will most likely be different from the church down the road, and that’s ok, however the character of the people involved should not be too different.

Deacons likewise must be dignified, not double-tongued, not addicted to much wine, not greedy for dishonest gain. They must hold the mystery of the faith with a clear conscience. 10 And let them also be tested first; then let them serve as deacons if they prove themselves blameless. 11 Their wives likewise must be dignified, not slanderers, but sober-minded, faithful in all things. 12 Let deacons each be the husband of one wife, managing their children and their own households well. 13 For those who serve well as deacons gain a good standing for themselves and also great confidence in the faith that is in Christ Jesus.

A Deacon is one who provides leadership through acts of practical service (Acts 6.1-6). Meeting particular needs, they lead through serving and exemplify the dedicated service of a believer to the Lord. Because they meet particular needs, their service within individual church bodies may look different. Maybe they aren’t as formally structured as the Elders, but will be there for sure, quietly working to make sure the church body is served.

Again, whether we all serve as Deacons or not is interesting. We are all called to serve the Lord and each other (Galatians 5.13, 1 Peter 4.10), therefore, you could make a case that we are all to be Deacons, meeting particular needs and ensuring that our church bodies are well maintained. There is no option in the Word for casually turning up to church, sitting, soaking it all in, and leaving. Everyone is contributing, everyone is part of the body (1 Corinthians 12.12, 14).

Maybe you don’t feel like serving the church practically is that important. Maybe you have refrained from volunteering your time and talents because you don’t think it will make much of a difference, it’s “only…“, but, look at v.13, those who serve well as deacons gain a good standing for themselves and also great confidence in the faith that is in Christ Jesus. It’s good for the church that we all serve as Deacons, it’s good for ourselves that we all serve as Deacons, and it’s good for our faith that we all serve as Deacons.

As with Elders, there is a difference between being a Deacon in character and being asked to serve on a particular board or within a particular team. The character is something we are to all be working towards and displaying. The character is more important.

May we be a church full of Elders and Deacons!

1 Timothy 3.7 – An Elder in Character

We continue then with Paul’s letter to Timothy. Today Paul, the church planter, writes to Timothy, the church leader, with instructions on how this fledgling fellowship should be led and supported. Within the structure of the letter, within the who-is-writing-to-who-about-what we begin to see God’s model for church leadership.

Today in 1 Timothy 3.7, the character of the men needed to help Timothy lead spiritually. Does that mean that if you’re not appointed to serve as an Elder you should never focus on these character qualities? Absolutely not!

The saying is trustworthy: If anyone aspires to the office of overseer, he desires a noble task. Therefore an overseer must be above reproach, the husband of one wife, sober-minded, self-controlled, respectable, hospitable, able to teach, not a drunkard, not violent but gentle, not quarrelsome, not a lover of money. He must manage his own household well, with all dignity keeping his children submissive, for if someone does not know how to manage his own household, how will he care for God’s church? He must not be a recent convert, or he may become puffed up with conceit and fall into the condemnation of the devil. Moreover, he must be well thought of by outsiders, so that he may not fall into disgrace, into a snare of the devil.

There will never be a church in the world where every single man who demonstrates these character qualities is actively serving as an Elder, because, in theory every man, and woman for that matter, should be working to display these qualities in their everyday life.


Being appointed to serve as an Elder should be seen as separate from simply being an Elder in character, something we all must do.


The character needed (an overseer MUST be…) is far more important than the actual structure within which these traits are deployed. It’s better to have a church full of Elder-like people than have only a handful, for sure. 

We see, then, that in this passage it all comes down to character, not gifting or ability.

We are all called to serve God (Hebrews 9.14), we are all uniquely gifted (1 Corinthians 12), but the character of a mature and maturing believer is something we should all aspire to regardless of age, gender, gifting, appointment, calling, or service. 

Today then, let us be believers who are outwardly demonstrating our growing maturity in the Lord by the character we display, let us all work towards being Elders in character.

1 Timothy 2.1-4 – Who Are You Praying For?

After introducing his letter with a charge to Timothy to make sure what is being accepted as right and true is, in fact, right and true, today Paul gets a little more specific as to how this new Christian community should conduct itself.

First of all, then, I urge that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be made for all people, for kings and all who are in high positions, that we may lead a peaceful and quiet life, godly and dignified in every way. This is good, and it is pleasing in the sight of God our Savior, who desires all people to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth.

Paul starts with first of all, and this is first in importance, not in chronology. This means that, first and foremost, a Christian community gathering as a church needs to be a place where prayer is made for all people. Prayer to the believer is communication with God, and here Paul lists a few categories of communication that the believer can use; supplications, prayers, intercession, and thanksgivings

The culture at the time would have had people praying to various perceived deities and authority figures, but we are told very clearly that prayer is to be made for all people, not to them. The specific example is given of kings and all who are in high positions, with the reason that we may lead a peaceful and quiet life, godly and dignified in every way

The leaders in our lives, be that at church, at work, at home, or at national level all need Jesus, no matter who they are or the high position they may hold. It’s often thought that those in such leadership positions have got it all together, know who they are and what they are doing, and generally don’t need as much help as your average person on the street. However, this isn’t the case, everyone needs to be in right relationship with God through faith in Jesus, everyone needs a Saviour, and God desires all people to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth, regardless of how they are occupying themselves during the day. 

So, today, pray for the leaders in your life. If you hold a position of leadership somewhere, still pray for the leaders in your life. We are all called to lead, and we are all called to serve in different circles, and we all need the Lord to help us do so.